Online treatment for opioids, including medication

Non-judgmental care that works, combining medication, therapeutic support, and human connection—entirely through your phone.

How does online recovery work?

Virtual treatment for at-home recovery from opioid addiction

FDA-approved medications support recovery, relieve withdrawal symptoms, and reduce cravings. 

An online Suboxone clinic that works

Workit Health combines the convenience of 100% virtual care, the effectiveness of clinical Suboxone treatment, and the personal connections of a recovery community. Get effective medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder without waiting rooms or judgment through our secure and confidential app. Workit Health providers understand that medication makes a huge difference in overcoming opioid cravings and relieving withdrawal symptoms. Our licensed clinicians will work with you to create a treatment plan, and your recovery will be supported by recovery groups, therapeutic courses, and chat support. 

Don’t struggle alone with the cycle of opioid use and withdrawal symptoms. The help you need is available right through your smartphone. 

Frequently asked questions

Will buprenorphine help me feel better right away?

Yes

With opioid addiction, people are physically and emotionally depleted. When you give someone the first couple of doses of buprenorphine, they immediately feel better. When you see them for their follow-up, they say they feel like a new person. It’s not often that you’re able to see the result of treatment so quickly.

Dr. Kevin Armington

Workit Physician, Board Member of Office of Alcoholism and Substance Use Services

What can I expect from the program? 

Physical, emotional, and mental support

You’ll meet with a clinician who listens. Then in Shared Medical Appointments, you’ll get support from that provider, other Workit Health members, and the behavioral health team. You’re not going to feel alone out there. We have groups you join and courses that you can do that are fun and not like being in school. It’s supportive. It’s a little something you carry in your pocket.

Shannon Brigham

Workit Physician Assistant, VP of Medical Practice, Adjunct Professor at Seton Hall University PA Program

Is telemedicine an effective way to treat addiction? 

Yes

With telemedicine, you can get the treatment that you need from the comfort of your home. Not everyone can find a babysitter to get to get to a treatment center. Workit Health was one of the first innovative programs to offer telehealth even before COVID. I love being able to reach out to people who need help wherever they are.

Janessa Perrin

Head of Behavioral Health, Master's of Social Work from University of Michigan

Has my opioid use become a problem?

Opioid Use Self-Assessment Quiz

Take our opioid self-assessment to check on your use and find out if Workit Health is right for you. This screening tool is a self-evaluation adapted from the DSM screening tool, and is designed as a self-assessment of opioid use.

Take our self-assessment check on your opioid use. This tool should not be used as a replacement for a clinical diagnosis.

Expert support in your pocket

Private and effective recovery that’s tailored to you for opioid or alcohol addiction.

Medical treatment

Community connection

Modern recovery tools

Shame-free recovery

Questions about treatment or pricing?

Citations

1. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). (2022). Medication-Assisted Treatment. https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment

2. American Society of Addiction Medicine. (2015). The ASAM National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26406300/

3. Soyka, M. (2015). New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone. Substance abuse and rehabilitation, 6, 1–14. https://doi.org/10.2147/SAR.S45585

4. Schuckit, M. A. (2016). Treatment of Opioid-Use Disorders, New England Journal of Medicine 375, no. 4: 357–68, http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMra1604339.

5. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2021). Medications to Treat Opioid Use Disorder Research Report. https://nida.nih.gov/publications/research-reports/medications-to-treat-opioid-addiction/overview

6. Shufman, E. N., Porat, S., Witztum, E., Gandacu, D., Bar-Hamburger, R., & Ginath, Y. (1994). The efficacy of naltrexone in preventing reabuse of heroin after detoxification, Biological Psychiatry, 35:12, 935-945. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(94)91240-8.

Our pages are medically reviewed and fact-checked by accredited medical professionals to ensure that all statements about medical conditions, symptoms, treatments, procedures and tests, standards of care, and typical protocols are accurate and reflect current guidelines as well as the latest research. However, please remember that the information on this page is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. Workit Health, Inc. and its affiliated professional entities make no representations or warranties and expressly disclaim any and all liability concerning any treatment, action by, or effect on any person following the general information offered or provided on this page. If you have specific concerns or a situation arises in which you require medical advice, you should consult with an appropriately trained and qualified medical services provider.

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