Running to Recovery: How Fitness Helped Me Heal

Running to Recovery: How Fitness Helped Me Heal

Fitness is often something we think about as a means to get healthy; by “get healthy” we often think of this as losing weight, increasing strength, gaining muscle, and toning up. These can all be very healthy things for your physical health, however the mental health benefits of fitness and exercise are far too often overlooked or passed over like an afterthought.

PRESS RELEASE: Workit Health Awarded Social Determinants NIDA Contract to Expand Development of Data-Driven Digital Addiction Treatment Program

PRESS RELEASE: Workit Health Awarded Social Determinants NIDA Contract to Expand Development of Data-Driven Digital Addiction Treatment Program

The National Institute on Drug Abuse contract advances Workit Health’s industry leading telemedicine addiction recovery program, promoting health equity through individualized support that solves for social determinants of health.

Resources for the Families of Those Suffering with Addiction

Resources for the Families of Those Suffering with Addiction

Unfortunately, substance use disorder doesn’t affect just one type of person — it impacts people in all walks of life, and most of them have families. It is a serious national public health problem affecting approximately 45 million families.

Is It Possible To Survive College Without a Hard Partying Lifestyle?

Is It Possible To Survive College Without a Hard Partying Lifestyle?

When I decided I would attend the Michigan State University, I knew some “basic” stories about the reputation that it withheld. Some phrases included “HUGE campus”, “great community”, “underrated education”, and most of all “party school”.

Can Sobriety Be Both a Health Trend and a Matter of Life or Death?

Can Sobriety Be Both a Health Trend and a Matter of Life or Death?

Months ago I innocently tweeted: “I’m all down with the new sobriety/sober movement but please let’s not forget among the mocktails, the trendiness and the tees with cutesy slogans that for many of us, sobriety wasn’t a health trend, lifestyle choice or a socio-political statement but a matter of life and death.”