Practical New Year's Resolutions For Every Stage Of Addiction Recovery

New Year's resolutions can feel daunting, but they don't have to be complicated or self-punishing. The new year is a great time for reflection and setting goals. As someone who has basically been on a perpetual diet since sixth grade, I am very familiar with New Year's resolutions. I thought every year would be the year that I finally lost those 10, 20, or 30 pounds. I am also very familiar with New Year’s fad diets that create unsustainable weight loss and leave us with nothing but disappointment by March. That’s why this year, I propose that we ditch the weight goal, or the dramatic life overhaul, and instead focus on improving our holistic health. Here are a few things to work on in 2018 that don’t revolve around a scale.

1. Fix your sleep schedule.

The National Sleep Foundation recently found that forty-five percent of Americans report their lack of sleep interferes with their daily life. Insufficient sleep can decrease our concentration capabilities, make us more vulnerable to sickness, and even increase our risk for diabetes and high blood pressure. For those of us who struggle with insomnia, simply setting an alarm may not be enough. If so, treat yourself to some super sleep resources! For example, Sleepio.com is a customizable sleep therapy program that will equip you with tools for better sleep! If you need someone to tuck you in, the Sleep With Me Podcast is sure to put you to sleep with the narrator’s soft, soothing voice and not-so-thrilling subjects. We've got more sleep tips, if you need them.

2. Be mindful.

Mindfulness is a form of meditation that focuses on the present and self reflection. it’s a bit of a fad right now – but for good reason!. It has shown to improve health in more ways than one. Mindful meditation has be shown to improve focus, relieve stress, improve athletic performance, and even help decrease pain. Don’t believe me? Check out this summary of mindfulness research and its results. I am a huge believer in meditation and it has helped me a lot in my recovery journey. This year, take time to be present, grateful, and centered. Ready to try meditation? We've got just the thing.

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Try a Coloring Meditation from our Workit Shares.

3. Read more.

Who reads anymore? According to the Huffington Post, successful people! Reading is a great way to expand our horizons, learn something new, or simply take a break from this wild world. It can also be a great way to unwind after a long day or connect with new friends at a book club. No matter your preferences, reading is a great hobby to start or re-visit. Start your 2018 reading career off with some suggestions from Workit’s own Community Lead, Kali Lux!

4. Set social media boundaries.

If you’re like me, you spend a LOT of time online. While social media sites are amazing places for staying in touch with friends or keeping up with world events, they can also be overwhelming. A study from the University of Missouri found that social media like Facebook can increase feelings of envy in its users that result in depression. Staying connected is important, but so is setting boundaries. Some common social media boundaries are limiting nighttime use, turning notifications off, and *shudders* leaving the house without your phone. I’m sure 2018 will bring many more opportunities to be glued to our phones. Let’s set boundaries and be prepared to unplug (even for a little while).

5. Take the next step.

Even though January first is a totally arbitrary date, we’re all for starting anew. The New Year is a great time to get healthy and get clean. You deserve it, and we’re here to help. Workit’s online addiction treatment is built by addicts, for addicts and completely customized to your needs. Addiction is tough, but you’re tougher. Get started today at https://workithealth.com and use "workitrocks" at checkout for 25% off.

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Brooke Houser is a mental health advocate, peer wellness coach, and a clinical intern at Workit Health. As someone who has struggled with disordered eating and negative body image, she is passionate about educating and empowering others around the topic. Brooke is currently pursuing her Masters Degree in Social Work with focuses in Interpersonal Practice, Mental Health and Human Services Management. In her spare time she enjoys hiking, spending time with her family, and listening to true crime podcasts.