Online Suboxone Doctors

Our telemedicine Suboxone clinicians are dedicated to helping you feel better. Receive science-backed treatment for opioid use disorder without going away to rehab.

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Online Suboxone Doctors

Our telemedicine Suboxone clinicians are dedicated to helping you feel better. Receive science-backed treatment for opioid use disorder without going away to rehab.

All the benefits of Suboxone care, from the privacy of home

Workit Health’s online Suboxone treatment program offers video visits with compassionate clinicians

How does online Suboxone care work?

Workit Health’s easy-to-use, HIPAA-compliant app brings the expertise of medication-assisted treatment to the privacy of your home.

First, download our app to make an appointment. Just like with an in-person doctor visit, you will need to give us some information about yourself, including uploading a photo of your ID. Your intake appointment may be with an intake counselor. When you meet with your licensed Suboxone clinician, it will be via a private, in-app video appointment. Your clinician will discuss your medical history and substance use so that they can provide you with the treatment that fits you best. Your medication will be e-prescribed to your local pharmacy.

Medication-assisted treatment works best in conjunction with behavioral health support, like group therapy and counseling. These appointments also take place in the app. Our online therapeutic curriculum will also provide you with insights and tools to help you move forward and create healthier habits. You’ll be able to message your care team (providers and counselors) directly through the app.

Is receiving Suboxone online legal?

Yes, this is 100% legal and legit. All of our clinicians are licensed and trained through the DEA to prescribe buprenorphine/naloxone (brand name Suboxone) and have the necessary waivers and certifications. Whether to prescribe Suboxone is a decision your clinician will make after a thorough clinical evaluation of your medical history and substance use.

In accordance with regulations and safe prescribing guidelines, you will be required to take regular drug tests. We’ll mail the tests to you, and you will complete them using the app. Drug testing is important for clinicians to provide the treatment you need, and is never used to shame or judge you.

Are online Suboxone doctors available in my state?

Currently, our Suboxone clinic and other medication-assisted treatment options are available in select states only. We’re dedicated to expanding to new states as quickly as possible.

What should I do if Workit isn’t available in my area?

If you live where Workit Health is not yet available, consider our online therapy program for counseling support. Online therapy is available in all fifty states, and your counselor can help you find a Suboxone provider near you.

If you would like to be the first to know when our online Suboxone doctors become available in your area, click here and fill out the form. We’ll reach out to let you know as soon as we begin accepting appointments in your state.

Can any online doctor prescribe Suboxone?

Probably not. Buprenorphine is a controlled substance. Clinicians need a special waiver from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to prescribe it, and the number of patients they can prescribe to is limited. General telemedicine practitioners like your regular doctor may not be willing or able to prescribe this type of medication. At Workit Health, we specialize in evidence-based addiction care like FDA-approved medication to manage withdrawal and cravings, so all of our doctors have taken the required training and received the necessary waiver.

How does Suboxone work?

Suboxone is one of three medications FDA-approved to treat opioid use disorder. It is called a partial agonist opioid which means it works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain, which causes limited pleasurable effects to stop withdrawal symptoms. However, for most people, it does not provide the “high” associated with opioids like heroin. Suboxone also contains naloxone (known by the brand name Narcan), which is an opioid antagonist meaning it blocks opioid receptors, preventing misuse.

Do I have to stop using opioids to take Suboxone?

Yes. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, you should be prepared before inducting on any medication-assisted treatment containing buprenorphine. This means stopping using opioids for a specified amount of time before you take Suboxone in order to prevent unpleasant side effects. That time period depends on what kind of opioid you have been taking. Your clinician will guide you in this process, so don’t be concerned about figuring it out for yourself. Generally speaking, short-acting opioids like Percocet, heroin, and Vicodin should be ceased 12-24 hours before your first dose of buprenorphine. Longer-acting opioids, like morphine, methadone, and Oxycontin are generally discontinued 36-48 hours before your first dose of Suboxone.

Talk to your provider before you quit taking opioids so that they can advise you on the appropriate time frame based on your personal medical history.

Questions about our treatment or pricing?

Medication-assisted treatment available in many states

With multiple clinic locations around the country, we are working to bring the very best care to you.

Online coaching available nationwide.