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Free addiction treatment for some Ashland residents

Uninsured and under-insured residents of Ashland County in Ohio may be eligible to receive clinical treatment for opioid and alcohol use disorders—including medication like Suboxone or naltrexone—at no cost to them, covered by a grant.

This grant is available certain uninsured and under-insured individuals in Ashland, Hancock, and Crawford Counties, Ohio. People with private insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid that fully covers their treatment will not be eligible.

Expert addiction treatment at no cost

With the support of a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration, some residents of Ashland County, Hancock County, and Crawford County in Ohio can receive Workit Health’s evidence-based, online treatment for opioid and alcohol use disorders at no cost to them. 

This grant-funded care is designed to make effective, non-judgmental treatment more accessible to member of rural Ohio communities. 

Fill out the form below to learn more and find out if you are eligible. 

How does online recovery work?

Addiction treatment for Ashland, Jackson, and other Ashland County communities

There is a myth that addiction and substance use disorders are big city problems. But the truth is that they affect all communities. In 2022, Substance Use and Misuse were ranked as the top health concern for Ashland County by the Ashland County Community Health Needs Assessment Steering Committee.

The Health Resources and Services Administration created a grant to help reach people in Ashland County who need addiction care but might not otherwise be able to access it. Uninsured and underinsured people in all corners of Ashland County (from Ashland to Loudonville, Milton to Sullivan, and all the places in between) may be eligible for free treatment, covered by this grant.

Fill out the form below to learn more and find out if you are eligible. 

Ready to find out if you're eligible for free addiction treatment?

Answers to your questions

Who is eligible for this no-cost treatment?

To be eligible for treatment coverage under this HRSA grant, you must be:

  • a resident of Ashland County, Hancock County, or Crawford County in Ohio
  • uninsured or under-insured
  • experiencing opioid use disorder or alcohol use disorder

In order to receive treatment from Workit Health’s telemedicine program, you will also need to have a computer, tablet, or smartphone with a camera and internet access.

As a member of Workit Health, you will have access to our online treatment program for opioid or alcohol use disorder. This includes:

  • video appointments with a licensed clinician who really listens
  • online recovery group sessions
  • in-app chat messaging with your care team
  • drug screening submitted via the Workit Health app
  • interactive therapeutic courses
  • medication e-prescribed to one of our partnering local pharmacies

Yes, this HRSA grant covers the cost of medications from one of our partnering local pharmacies.

Prescribing medication is always at the discretion of the provider. When appropriate, Workit Health clinicians will prescribe medications including Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) or naltrexone. 

Rural communities are heavily affected by substance use disorders, but often don’t have the treatment options available in more urban areas. To counter this and support rural counties in Ohio, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awarded Workit Health a grant to improve access to care in Ashland, Hancock, and Crawford Counties in Ohio.

It can be hard to trust that anyone would give you something for nothing, but this is a legitimate, government-funded grant intended to support rural health. It’s real. You can learn more about this RCORP program here. 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number HB1RH49881. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

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