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Suboxone Treatment in Alaska: What You Need to Know

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Looking for Suboxone treatment in Alaska? Simple strategies for finding the best Suboxone doctor for you.

Not sure if Suboxone treatment is for you, or struggling to find help? If you’re an Alaskan struggling with pain pills or heroin, quitting can feel daunting. You may get sick when you stop cold turkey, but not be sure where to go for help with your withdrawal. Medication-assisted treatment like Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) or methadone can help you get through withdrawal and find long-term recovery.

What is medication-assisted treatment?

Medication-assisted treatment refers to medication that used for addiction, commonly to opioids like oxycodone, Percocet, heroin, and fentanyl. Methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone (most commonly known by the popular brand name Suboxone) are the two most commonly used medications for opioid recovery. In addition to using these medications, recovery may include behavioral support such as individual or group therapy or recovery coaching.

Who is able to prescribe methadone and Suboxone in Alaska?

In Alaska, as in all fifty U.S. states, the regulations for treating addiction with methadone and Suboxone vary. Opioid Treatment Programs, commonly known as methadone clinics, dispense methadone in a strictly regulated environment. Opioid Treatment Programs keep and dispense medication on-site, and the federal government monitors these programs with strict regulations. This is why methadone treatment often requires in-person visits daily with little flexibility.

Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) is also an effective treatment for opioid addiction, also known as opioid use disorder, but has less of a potential for misuse than methadone. This means that it is still heavily regulated by the federal government, but able to be prescribed to a local pharmacy. Most Suboxone providers begin with weekly prescriptions as patients stabilize on the medication, and then move to biweekly then monthly scripts.

In order to prescribe Suboxone, a physician or nurse practitioner must have a special waiver. This means that not all doctors are able to prescribe this life-saving medication. At Workit Health, we have clinicians able to prescribe Suboxone in Alaska able to see people virtually, making receiving care simpler than ever.

Other types of medication-assisted treatment can treat other addictions. For example, there is medication to help people quit smoking and medication to help people quit drinking. Workit Health offers at-home alcohol detox, and ongoing naltrexone and acamprosate treatment to Alaskans looking for help with alcohol.

Where can I find Suboxone treatment in Alaska?

In Alaska, there are several options for finding Suboxone treatment. Workit Health serves the entire state with virtual Suboxone care via an easy-to-use app. Members have video visits with their clinicians, join recovery groups, and even drug test virtually through their phones. This type of virtual Suboxone treatment in Alaska does require either a smartphone or a computer and access to the internet. In Alaska, Workit Health accepts Original Medicare, Premera, and LifeWise insurance for this treatment. This Suboxone treatment is available to all residents of Alaska, from Anchorage to Juneau and even the most rural towns.

For Alaskans who don’t live near a pharmacy and are in a more rural area, Workit Health is able to partner with a mail-order pharmacy to send your Suboxone to you. Workit members typically start with weekly visits and weekly prescriptions and then move to biweekly and monthly as time goes on. You can get started with Workit Health’s virtual program in less than 5 minutes, and same week appointments are available. Sign up now.

If you’re not comfortable with receiving care virtually, there are in-person treatment options in Alaska which offer Suboxone treatment. Ideal Option offers in-person Suboxone care in an outpatient setting and has locations in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Kenai, Ketchikan, and Wasila. This type of clinic typically requires twice a week visits at first, with visits becoming less frequent as time goes on. Many in-person treatment centers are taking extra precautions in the face of COVID-19.

Opioid treatment programs, more commonly known as methadone clinics, also provide treatment in Alaska. Methadone clinics usually require in-person visits every day but can prescribe Suboxone as an alternative to methadone. AnchorageCTC is a methadone clinic in Anchorage.

The Opioid Epidemic in Alaska

If you’re struggling with opioids, remember you aren’t alone and recovery is possible. From 2010 to 2017, Alaska’s overdose rate from opioids increased 77%. But treatment options are also increasing, and technology is making it easier than every to start your recovery from the privacy of home.

As Workit Health’s Head of Marketing, Kali Lux leans in to the culture gap between addiction, recovery, and medicine. She’s interested in finding solutions that work for substance users better than drinking or drugging does, and believes Workit is one of them. She’s written extensively on her own experience through addiction into long-term recovery. You can connect with her on Twitter @kalireadsbooks.

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